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Monday, September 18, 2017

ISLAMIC FACE COSTUME LEADS TO DEPORTATION AT BRUSSELS’ AIRPORT


It's very hard to identify someone in such a costume. Belgium banned women from wearing the niqab and burqa on July 23, 2011.

It's very hard to identify someone in such a costume. Belgium banned women from wearing the niqab and burqa on July 23, 2011.




Islamic face veil has been a major issue of discussion throughout Europe. To expand security and create a safe environment, some European countries want to ban Islamic face veils for easy identification. This new safety rule has nothing to do with discrimination against Islam. 

A Danish Muslim woman who allegedly refused to take off her niqab at Brussels Airport has been deported to Tunisia after police were unable to identify her.


State Secretary for Asylum and Migration, Theo Francken, confirmed the incident on his official Twitter account on Saturday.

He tweeted: “A Danish citizen coming from Tunis refused to take off her niqab at our border. Police could not identify her. She was sent back to Tunis.”

The woman was not identified by her name in the tweet.
Franken added: “Thursday I informed my Danish colleague Inger [Stojberg, Danish minister for immigration, integration, and housing] about the niqab-incident with a Danish citizen on our Schengen border.”

On 23 July 2011, Belgium banned women from wearing the niqab and burqa, the Islamic garment which covers the face and full body, and imposed a fine and a prison sentence up to seven days on women caught wearing a full-face veil.

Belgium was the second European country to ban the niqab in public, raising fears among Muslim communities and human rights campaigners that other countries could follow suit.

The idea was first proposed by the Flemish far-right as “the first step against Islamisation.”

Amnesty International condemned the move at the time, deeming it as “an attack on religious freedom”.

Philippe Hensmans, of Amnesty Belgium, said it had been pushed through without a proper national debate.

He said: “It’s also not at all clear that it is in line with the Belgian constitution and with international human rights conventions.”

However, the anti-niqab legislation has found widespread support across the left-right political divide with opposition to the garment creating unnatural alliances between social conservatives and feminist pressure groups.



Opinion of the writers of this blog


In this dangerous time, terrorism is at its peak, it's necessary for security officials to maintain a thorough security check up to ensure everyone's safety.  

The Belgian government on July 23, 2011,  banned women from wearing the niqab and burqa, the Islamic garment which covers the face and full body.

The violation of the law follows a fine and a prison sentence up to seven days on women caught wearing a full-face veil.

It's right for the Belgian authorities to deport the woman who refused to be identified back to Tunisia. They say "If you go to Rome, you do what the Romans do."

Every country has its laws, rules, and regulations which everyone including citizens and foreigners must obey.

In the past, many suicide bombers have dressed like women to detonate explosives, therefore, security is essential. 

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