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Sunday, November 6, 2016

WHY JAPAN SUSPENDED THE VACCINATION OF HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS IN THE COUNTRY?


JAPAN SUSPENDED THE VACCINATION OF HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS IN THE COUNTRY

JAPAN SUSPENDED THE VACCINATION OF HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS IN THE COUNTRY


Centers for Diseases Control definition of Human Papillomavirus and spread



HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI). HPV is a different virus than HIV and HSV (herpes). HPV is so common that nearly all sexually-active men and women get it at some point in their lives. 

There are many different types of HPV. Some types can cause health problems including genital warts and cancers. But there are vaccines that can stop these health problems from happening.

How is HPV spread?

You can get HPV by having vaginal, anal, or oral sex with someone who has the virus. It is most commonly spread during vaginal or anal sex. HPV can be passed even when an infected person has no signs or symptoms.

Anyone who is sexually active can get HPV, even if you have had sex with only one person. You also can develop symptoms years after you have sex with someone who is infected making it hard to know when you first became infected.

Does HPV cause health problems?

In most cases, HPV goes away on its own and does not cause any health problems. But when HPV does not go away, it can cause health problems like genital warts and cancer.

Genital warts usually appear as a small bump or group of bumps in the genital area. They can be small or large, raised or flat, or shaped like a cauliflower. A healthcare provider can usually diagnose warts by looking at the genital area.

Who should get vaccinated?

All boys and girls ages 11 or 12 years should get vaccinated.
Catch-up vaccines are recommended for males through age 21 and for females through age 26 if they did not get vaccinated when they were younger.

The vaccine is also recommended for gay and bisexual men (or any man who has sex with a man) through age 26. It is also recommended for men and women with compromised immune systems (including people living with HIV/AIDS) through age 26 if they did not get fully vaccinated when they were younger.

Why Japan suspended the vaccination?

This background paper analyses the events surrounding suspension of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination recommendation by Japan’s Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare in response to public anxieties about a suspected adverse event following immunization.

The paper explores how the issues in Japan have been perceived across the globe and the similarities and differences with HPV vaccine concerns in Australia, France, India, the United Kingdom, and the United Sates.

The paper also presents possible options that Japanese stakeholders could take in the hope of resolving current concerns and uncertainty surrounding the HPV vaccine. Given the recognized importance of the human papillomavirus in causing multiple cancers, it is critical not to lose public trust in a vaccine that will only become more important in the future.


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